See Disneynature’s ‘Monkey Kingdom’ to Help Protect Wild Primates and Their Habitats

Amid jungle-covered ruins, a mother and son strive to find their place in a turbulent community. This intriguing story is made even more so by the fact that its characters aren’t human.

infant toque macaque

Kip, an infant toque macaque in Sri Lanka. Disneynature’s new film, “Monkey Kingdom,” follows a troop of toque macaques (including Kip) forced by territorial disputes with a rival gang of macaques to find food and shelter in closer proximity with people — until they can regroup and attempt to reclaim their kingdom. (COURTESY OF DISNEYNATURE)

Monkey Kingdom,” the latest feature film from Disneynature, does more than take moviegoers into the stunning forests of Sri Lanka. It also brings them out of it, as the filmmakers follow a troop of toque macaques forced by territorial disputes with a rival gang of macaques to find food and shelter in closer proximity with people — until they can regroup and attempt to reclaim their kingdom.

The links between people and wildlife are a crucial intersection for CI, so it’s no surprise that Disneynature has chosen us as a beneficiary of a portion of the film’s sales during opening week in the U.S.

When you see the film in theaters between Friday, April 17th and Thursday, April 23rd, Disneynature will make a donation in your honor to CI to protect monkeys and other endangered species, restore forest habitats and support local communities.

Specifically, funding will go toward these three projects:

  • On the Indonesian island of Java, working with communities to build a “green wall” of trees between two national parks to protect the region’s crucial water supply and the wildlife that resides there, including endangered Javan gibbons.
  • In Sri Lanka, collaborating with local organizations to fund scientific research, tree-planting, community engagement and the creation of new conservation areas.
  • In Cambodia’s Veun Sai region,supporting forest monitoring by teams of community and forest rangers, as well as expanding an ecotourism project centered on a rare population of the northern yellow-cheeked crested gibbon.

Earlier this year, CI Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist Dr. M. Sanjayan traveled to Sri Lanka — the country of his birth — with world-renowned primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall to film bonus footage for the film’s DVD release. Here’s a sneak peek of Sanjayan’s experience.


Want more monkeys? Go see “Monkey Kingdom” in theaters this week and support CI’s work to keep the forests that make life possible — not only for millions of people, but for our primate relatives — standing and thriving for generations to come.

Molly Bergen is the senior managing editor of Human Nature. Check out other blogs about “Monkey Kingdom.”

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  1. Pingback: Researchers discover two tiny new primate species in a far-flung forest | Human Nature - Conservation International Blog

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