To save nature, we can’t be scared of the deep end

water, Madagascar

Girl plays in the water in Madagascar. (© Cristina Mittermeier)

Turning away from nature isn’t going to save it.

For Conservation International’s CEO, M. Sanjayan, saving nature means diving into the deep end — in his case, literally. After a palm reading as a young child foretold death by drowning, Sanjayan’s family kept him far away from the water. Until one day, his mother took a bold step: She taught him how to swim.

“She wanted to give me a fighting chance,” Sanjayan writes. “I, for one, want to be like my mother: I want to give Earth a fighting chance.” But loving nature isn’t enough, he explains. Neither is ignoring it. If we want to make a difference, we need to show nature’s value— to people.

In this piece, Sanjayan takes you to CI projects around the world that are helping to boost livelihoods and protect resources. From sustainably catching crabs in Brazil to revolutionizing cattle herding in South Africa, these projects are critical to helping save nature — and the communities that rely on it for survival.

We’ve been told the natural world is dying, and we’re the cause of it. What are we going to do?

“I say, we all learn to swim.”

Read more here.

Morgan Lynch is a staff writer at Conservation International.

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