5 myths about farmed seafood

Fish and clam farm in Ha Long Bay, Vietnam. (© pizmovka) Editor’s note: With 3 billion people relying on seafood as their chief source of protein, farmed seafood — known as “aquaculture” — will be crucial to feeding a growing population without further depleting our oceans. Although it supplies nearly half of all seafood consumed globally, aquaculture gets a bad rap. In this piece, we puncture some of the myths about farmed seafood. Myth #1:…

Farmer Training Essential to Fight Climate Change Impacts

Joanne Sonenshine recently traveled to the Indonesian island of Sumatra to join Starbucks’ annual Origin Experience trip, which sends select employees to places of coffee origin to learn about coffee production, sourcing and farming. Read her previous blog from this trip. Coffee berries in Indonesia — site of Starbucks’ recent Origin Experience trip. (© CI/photo by Fazrin Rahmadani) You know the idiom: “Give a man a fish and he will eat…

In a Changing Climate, Farming Methods Have Big Impact

Farayi Madziwa is currently attending the 17th Conference of the Parties (COP 17) of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Durban, South Africa. Read other COP 17 posts. By adopting sustainable farming practices like agroforestry and composting, farmers can help mitigate climate change by maximizing the amount of carbon sequestered and stored on their land. (© Benjamin Drummond) In 2007, a South African farmer named…

For farmers facing a changing climate, a new hope

Wapishana-Macushi children at Nappi village in the Kanuku mountains, Guyana. (© Conservation International/photo by Haroldo Castro) Editor’s note: U.N. climate negotiations continue this week in Marrakech as the world’s nations discuss how they will work together to fight and adapt to climate change impacts already affecting the lives of people around the globe. With livelihoods directly dependent on reliable weather patterns, farmers are…

Fighting Food Insecurity In My Own Backyard

A farm volunteer clears the oilseed radish cover crop to prepare garden beds for spring planting. (© Mandy Morgan) “Hey! Where’s the tomatoes at?” Ben calls out across a half-acre produce farm in a low-income neighborhood of Washington, D.C. He is a local resident who appears to be in his late 60s. “Tomatoes?” asks Anita Adalja, a petite, tan young woman who manages this urban farm. “It’s not time yet. It’s too cold. Come back in August….

When it comes to food production, sustainability pays. Here’s how

A coffee farmers, pictured above, in Alto Mayo, Peru. (© Conservation International/photo by Chris Tuite) What do Ecuador’s tuna fishers, Botswana’s cattle herders and Peru’s coffee farmers have in common? Students are finding ways for them to make more money. Conservation International, in partnership with The University of California-Los Angeles’ (UCLA) Anderson School of Management as part of its Applied Management Research (AMR) program,…

One year after devastation in Fiji, resilience takes root

Farm in Tokaimalo, Fiji. CI Fiji is helping local farmers restore farms and ecosystems destroyed by Tropical Cyclone Winston and strengthen themselves against future storms. (© Conservation International/photo by Lauren Brielle Neville) Editor’s note: Human Nature is exploring the complexities of living in, using and protecting one of the planet’s most valuable types of ecosystems — tropical forests — in a series we’re calling “No forest, no…

Charting a sustainable path in a land of peat, oil palm and pollution

Smallholder oil palm plantations are a common sight in Mandailing Natal, in Indonesia’s North Sumatra province. (© Conservation International/photo by Tory Read) Editor’s note: In Indonesia, the world’s top palm oil producer, the crop is critically important to the livelihoods of the smallholder farmers who grow about 40 percent of it. But too often, palm oil represents a trade-off between economic expansion and clearing forest and…

What we’re reading: Night fish, pollution-fighting rice

In countless villages around the world — including this one in Indonesia — farmers grow rice as a staple crop. New research has identified rice varieties that may require less fertilizer, which is good news for people and the planet. (© Conservation International/photo by Tory Read) Editor’s note: News about conservation and the environment is made every day, but some of it can fly under the radar. In this occasional series, Human Nature…

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