Day 9: Diving and dilly-dallying

Hello again Race fans, I’m Rowdy Gaines here with Mr. Leatherback, bringing you the Great Turtle Race! Boy do we have some major action in the Race as the week comes to a close!

Backspacer is very close to the finish line but won’t cross. She just can’t seem to make up her mind about entering the Caribbean. Will her dilly-dallying cost her the Race? Will another turtle take advantage of her indecisiveness and speed past her across the finish line?

ON THE MAP: Don’t forget to follow the turtles on the race map!

Several turtles are spinning around the same 10-12°N latitude area north of South America, including Lindblad the Explorer, Nightswimmer, Estéban, Seabiscuit, and Nueva Esperanza. Who will break out of that pack? It looks like Estéban might be the first to leave that group and head for the finish line! But where will he cross?

Grembo Jones and Searcher are still off on their own, probably taking advantage of being away from all those bigger turtles and finding lots of jellies all for themselves!

Cali definitely seems to be heading away from the Caribbean and back toward New England and Nova Scotia. Does he think this racetrack goes in a loop?

Don’t you wish you could see what the turtles see while they race toward the finish line? Get a glimpse in today’s blog by humorist George Meyer.

Also, Janet Evans – the greatest female long-distance swimmer of all time lets us in on her training secrets for Nightswimmer and her other turtles. Read the full post >>

And the results are in for the longest dive competition! Find out which turtle made the most dives lasting over 60 min!

To follow this one up, check back on Monday, April 27th to find out which turtle made the most frequent deep dives!

Who knows, we might even have a winner in the Race on Monday!

Comments

  1. Janet Arone says

    I feel as if I’m swimming with the amazing Leatherbacks! Where is BILLY ….. ? Our Students are all hoping for the best and their interest and concern is encouraging. Very few Leatherbacks are seen in our area of Fiji these days … tragic isn’t it? Well done to ALL involved in this vital effort to help save the species. Vinaka vakalevu!

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